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For Immediate Release:

Oct. 4, 2021

For more information:
Contact DNR Information Center
by email or call 888-646-6367.


DNR to Review Siting Rule for Nonferrous Mines

Today, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) filed a Procedural Order in Ramsey County District Court outlining the process the department will use to review Minnesota’s siting rule for nonferrous mines.

The Procedural Order describes how the DNR will seek public comment and make a decision on whether the state’s existing nonferrous mine siting rule (Minnesota Rule 6132.2000 Subparts 2A and 3A) is adequate to protect the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) from pollution, impairment or destruction from potential mining within the Rainy River Headwaters watershed. The DNR will accept public comments on the adequacy of the siting rule from November 9, 2021 through December 8, 2021.

On June 24, 2020, Northeastern Minnesotans for Wilderness (NEMW), sued the DNR under the Minnesota Environmental Rights Act. NEMW claims in its lawsuit that Minnesota’s longstanding nonferrous mine siting rule is inadequate to protect the BWCAW. Specifically, NEMW asserts that Minnesota Rule 6132.2000 (Subparts 2A and 3A) should prohibit nonferrous metallic mineral mining (e.g., copper-nickel mining) in the entirety of the Rainy River Headwaters watershed, which flows into the BWCAW. Currently, the rule prohibits mining in the BWCAW and prohibits mining that disturbs the surface in a specified area around the BWCAW.

At the DNR’s request, the Court issued a September 13, 2021 order sending the case back to the DNR for further proceedings. This approach allows the DNR, as the state’s primary regulatory authority for mining, to assess the adequacy of the siting rule through a robust administrative process that ensures agency experts have an opportunity to carefully consider all relevant evidence.  The Procedural Order issued today outlines how DNR will seek public comment on the following question:

With express consideration of how Minn. R. 6132.2000, subp. 2A and subp. 3A fit within the broader context of all applicable environmental protection in state and federal law regulating nonferrous mining, are the exclusion of mining in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) set forth in Minn. R. 6132.2000 subp. 2A, and the prohibition of surface disturbance in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness Mineral Management Corridor as set forth in Minn. R. 6132.2000, subp. 3A adequate to protect the BWCAW from pollution, impairment, or destruction or should further restrictions on mining be extended to all or part of the Rainy River- Headwaters defined as HUC 09030001?

As described in the Procedural Order, the DNR will seek substantive public comments from November 9, 2021 through December 8, 2021 to assist the department in its decision making.  Since this comment period is associated with a court approved process, the comment period will be limited to 30 days; however, interested parties may begin to develop their comments prior to the opening of the comment period.

The DNR has established a dedicated webpage for DNR’s review of the siting rule. This webpage will be used to house information about the review process and contains a link to sign up for future GovDelivery emails on this topic. The DNR will use the GovDelivery list to announce the start of the public comment period on November 9, 2021.

July 29, 2021

This month, we’re highlighting what’s new for the 2021 deer hunting season! Read the highlights here and on the deer hunting webpage, or do a deep dive by checking out the 2021 Minnesota Hunting and Trapping Regulations handbook online.

cover of 2021 Hunting and Trapping Regulations handbook

Deer hunting season details available

Ready to plan ahead for the fall? Check out the details for the 2021 season in the Minnesota Hunting and Trapping regulations handbook, now available on the  DNR website . Printed copies of the handbook will be delivered to hunting license vendors the first week of August.

Hunting licenses go on sale Sunday, Aug. 1. You can buy your license at any DNR license agent, by telephone at 888-665-4236, or online at  mndnr.gov/buyalicense .

Archery deer season opens Saturday, Sept. 18, and firearms deer season opens Saturday, Nov. 6. Find out more on the  deer hunting page.

map of Minnesota deer permit areas with bag limit designations

Deer bag limit name changes

Bag-limit labels have been changed to make the limits clearer:

  • “Lottery” is now “antlerless permit lottery” (one-deer limit)
  • “Hunter choice” is now “either-sex” (one-deer limit)
  • “Managed” is now “two-deer limit”
  • “Intensive” is now “three-deer limit”
  • “Unlimited antlerless” is now “five-deer limit”

“Bucks only” remains the same, with the one-deer limit. Areas that were previously under an unlimited antlerless bag limit are now a five-deer limit.

Early antlerless season expands

The DNR has expanded the early antlerless deer season, Oct. 21-24, to include more deer permit areas in central and southeastern Minnesota. The season increases opportunities for hunters in areas where deer populations are above population goals or where there is an increased risk of chronic wasting disease spreading. Permit areas open during the hunt are 213, 214, 215, 221, 227, 236, 277, 341, 342, 343, 604, 605, 643, 645, 646, 647, 648, 649, 655 and 701. Early antlerless permits go on sale Aug. 1.

snapshot of some DPAs with new boundaries for 2021

Check your deer permit area boundary

Several deer permit area boundaries in southwest and northeast Minnesota have changed based input from the public, tribal communities and DNR staff. The permit areas affected are: 169, 171, 173, 179, 184, 197, 237, 259, 275, 276, 277, 281, 282, 283 and 295.

Changes are depicted on the 2021 Deer Season Area Map and hunters should double-check the boundaries of any permit areas where they plan to hunt, as well as bag limits in those areas.

2021 CWD zone map

Key CWD changes for the 2021 season

  • Mandatory sampling of deer harvested in chronic wasting disease zones will resume this year during the opening weekends of both firearms A and B seasons.
  • The names of the zones are simplified to three tiers: management zone, control zone and surveillance zone.
  • The surveillance zone has expanded following detections of the disease in wild and captive deer, adding deer permit areas 110, 184, 197, 233 and 342, and a portion of deer permit area 169.
  • Late chronic wasting disease hunts are scheduled for Dec. 17-19 and Dec. 31-Jan. 2; additional details will be posted on the DNR website closer to hunt dates.

Check out the  regulations book  (PDF) and the  webpage  for more information.

young hunter dressed in blaze orange

Apply for special youth deer hunts

Minnesota has  special hunting opportunities for youth deer hunters . There is a limited number of permits for each hunt, with the individual hunts taking place on various dates during the fall in state parks and a national wildlife refuge. Adults must accompany youth during these hunts. Hunters may apply for special youth hunt permits through Friday, Aug. 20. Special youth deer hunts are different from the statewide youth deer season that does not require an application and takes place Oct. 21-24.

statewide map of goal-setting blocks

Deer population goals released

Results of the second year of deer population goal-setting are now available  online . This year focused on portions of southwest and northeast Minnesota. Thank you to those of you who participated in the virtual engagement options this year!

Next year will focus on deer permit areas in the northeast, north-central and southeast portions of the state (noted in green in the map) and will start later this winter. Stay tuned for details of when and how you can provide your input for those areas and check out the  deer populations and goals webpage  for more information.

hunter dressed in blaze orange with ear protection

Webinar: How to get certified in firearms safety

Do you know someone who wants to go hunting this fall? Join a chat with DNR conservation officers officers at noon Wednesday, Aug. 4, to discuss Minnesota hunter safety requirements, including how to get certified in firearms safety.

The webinar is part of the  Minnesota Outdoor Skills and Stewardship Series  that aims to give participants quick, relevant information on upcoming seasons and events, and skills to help enjoy these opportunities. Registration is free.

areas where deer feeding and attractant bans are in place

Feeding ban reminder

Feeding and attractant bans are critical in limiting the spread of chronic wasting disease in wild deer. Due to the detection of CWD in Beltrami county, the deer feeding ban is expected to expand to include Beltrami County and neighboring counties this fall.

Currently there are deer feeding or attractant bans in the following counties: Aitkin, Carlton, Cass, Chisago, Crow Wing, Dakota, Dodge, Douglas, Fillmore, Freeborn, Goodhue, Hennepin, Houston, Hubbard, Isanti, Kanabec, Mille Lacs, Morrison, Mower, Olmsted, Pine, Pope, Ramsey, Rice, Scott, Stearns, Steele, Todd, Wabasha, Wadena, Washington and Winona.

Learn more about what you need to do to help our wild deer, and the difference is between feeding and attracting deer, on the  deer feeding ban webpage .

Get complete CWD information

Deer hunters, please regularly check the DNR website at  mndnr.gov/cwd  for the most recent information.

You are receiving this email because you subscribed to Deer Notes on the DNR website. You can  manage your subscriptions here .

Stay informed! Here’s a summary of upcoming fisheries and habitat management activities and ways you can discover, explore and experience Minnesota’s outdoors.

two kids fishing off the dock with a sunset

Fishing opener is Saturday

Fishing opener is this Saturday, May 15! That means the start of fishing for walleye, bass, northern pike, and trout in lakes, plus the kickoff of the summer tourism season.

We treasure our fishing traditions in Minnesota, where we have about 1.4 million licensed anglers each year and a half a million of them who fish during the fishing opener. Minnesotans have extensive fishing opportunities — for a great variety of fish species — at 4,500 fishing lakes plus 3,800 miles of trout streams and 16,000 miles of fishable streams and rivers.

You can find fantastic fishing opportunities all across Minnesota, and your fishing license dollars help improve those opportunities. We wish you a great 2021 fishing season!

More details:  Your fishing license dollars at work

Thanks to Steve McChesney for the photo taken at Monson Lake State Park

angler holding a large walleye

How to find fishing information

Find answers to fishing questions at the DNR fishing webpage, a mobile-friendly destination for information about fishing. From there you can use LakeFinder, which provides maps and detailed information on lakes throughout the state, and the new StreamFinder tool that provides a description, species list, regulations and access information for trout streams throughout Minnesota. The DNR fishing page also includes the Minnesota fishing regulations.

More details:  DNR fishing page

person falling into the water

Prepare for cold water during fishing opener

While we’ve had some extra ice-free days this spring on many of the state’s water bodies, relatively cool weather since then — including overnight lows in the 30s — means the water temperature may be lower than you might expect.

As you prepare to hit the water for Saturday’s fishing opener, it’s vital to keep this in mind and put safety first. In many places the water temperature remains dangerously cold. Please be aware of this and plan accordingly.

The law requires anyone younger than 10 to wear a life jacket when boating, but the DNR urges everyone to wear a life jacket when they’re on or near water. This is especially important when water temperatures are low. Wearing a life jacket is the easiest and most effective way to prevent a tragedy.

More details:  DNR cold water dangers page

two anglers fishing on the Mississippi River

DNR launches My Minnesota Outdoor Adventure

In partnership with Share the Mic Minnesota, we’re kicking off a unique social media campaign to encourage diversity, equity, and inclusion on Minnesota’s public lands and waters.

#MyMNOutdoorAdventure is launching in conjunction with the Governor’s Fishing Opener. We’re encouraging Minnesotans of diverse backgrounds to share your stories and pictures about fishing, hunting, camping and other outdoor activities by uploading them to the DNR’s website. The DNR will then feature these stories, and accompanying photos, on its Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter channels and also on its website.

More details:  Upload an outdoor story and photo

pike being released by a hand from a boat

Keeping pike? Be aware of northern pike zone regulations

If you might want to keep northern pike when the season opens on May 15, please familiarize yourself with the regulations and be prepared to measure the fish. Minnesota has three northern pike zones that apply to inland waters and reflect the differing characteristics of pike populations across the state.

More details:  DNR northern pike page

married combo license, new requirements, each spouse must provide full name, birthdate, social security number, driver's license number

How to buy married combination licenses and redeem vouchers

Do you usually purchase a married combination license? Please be aware of a change this year that brings the DNR into compliance with federal and state laws and helps prevent licenses from being issued to those with violations or unpaid fines. The change requires both spouses who purchase a married combination license to provide and verify their DNR customer records for these licenses.

If purchasing in person, both spouses must be present. If both are not present, one spouse may purchase their part of the license and their spouse may obtain their license at a later date at no additional charge using a spouse voucher number.

Anglers should remember to redeem their vouchers. Redeeming the voucher is quick and easy. Without redeeming the voucher, the spouse with the voucher cannot legally fish.

More details:  Married combination license page

boat in the water

Boaters: renew your watercraft registration online or in person

Boaters, please remember to renew your watercraft registration if it has expired. The DNR encourages boaters to renew boat registrations online or at a local deputy registrar’s office rather than by mail. If you renew online, you can print out the confirmation page to use as a temporary permit, or you may write down the temporary authorization number from the confirmation page. You’ll later get the registration card and expiration decals in the mail.

To renew online, visit the DNR’s online license sales web page, click on “Get Started” and follow the prompts. To renew in person, visit a deputy registrar. Deputy registrar locations are available on the Minnesota Department of Public Safety website.

More details:  DNR online license sales  and  DPS registrar location list

kid holding a big largemouth bass

Webinar focuses on how to consistently catch bass

Anyone interested in learning more about the finer points of bass fishing is invited to join a webinar at noon on Wednesday, May 19. The webinar is part of the Minnesota Outdoor Skills and Stewardship Series that aims to give participants quick, relevant information on upcoming seasons and events, and skills to help enjoy these opportunities.

During the webinar, Abbey Rabine, an avid and successful bass angler as well as pro-staff at Rapala, joins Ray Ruiz, DNR hunting and fishing skills liaison and also a pro tournament angler, to discuss how to catch more bass consistently, all year around.

More details:  DNR Outdoor Skills and Stewardship Series page

sunfish in hand

New to fishing? DNR has helpful information online to learn how

Anyone interested in learning how to fish can find helpful how-to guides on the DNR’s learn to fish pages. Find out how and where to fish, learn about fishing equipment, read about ways to catch different kinds of fish, and get acquainted with fishing ethics and stewardship.

More details:  DNR learn to fish page

Find fishing information

You can find the information you need about learning to fish, regulations, where to fish, aquatic invasive species, contacting a conservation officer and more on the DNR fishing page at  mndnr.gov/fishing .

Stay informed! Here’s a summary of upcoming fisheries and habitat management activities and ways you can discover, explore and experience Minnesota’s outdoors.

two kids fishing off the dock with a sunset

Fishing opener is Saturday

Fishing opener is this Saturday, May 15! That means the start of fishing for walleye, bass, northern pike, and trout in lakes, plus the kickoff of the summer tourism season.

We treasure our fishing traditions in Minnesota, where we have about 1.4 million licensed anglers each year and a half a million of them who fish during the fishing opener. Minnesotans have extensive fishing opportunities — for a great variety of fish species — at 4,500 fishing lakes plus 3,800 miles of trout streams and 16,000 miles of fishable streams and rivers.

You can find fantastic fishing opportunities all across Minnesota, and your fishing license dollars help improve those opportunities. We wish you a great 2021 fishing season!

More details:  Your fishing license dollars at work

Thanks to Steve McChesney for the photo taken at Monson Lake State Park

angler holding a large walleye

How to find fishing information

Find answers to fishing questions at the DNR fishing webpage, a mobile-friendly destination for information about fishing. From there you can use LakeFinder, which provides maps and detailed information on lakes throughout the state, and the new StreamFinder tool that provides a description, species list, regulations and access information for trout streams throughout Minnesota. The DNR fishing page also includes the Minnesota fishing regulations.

More details:  DNR fishing page

person falling into the water

Prepare for cold water during fishing opener

While we’ve had some extra ice-free days this spring on many of the state’s water bodies, relatively cool weather since then — including overnight lows in the 30s — means the water temperature may be lower than you might expect.

As you prepare to hit the water for Saturday’s fishing opener, it’s vital to keep this in mind and put safety first. In many places the water temperature remains dangerously cold. Please be aware of this and plan accordingly.

The law requires anyone younger than 10 to wear a life jacket when boating, but the DNR urges everyone to wear a life jacket when they’re on or near water. This is especially important when water temperatures are low. Wearing a life jacket is the easiest and most effective way to prevent a tragedy.

More details:  DNR cold water dangers page

two anglers fishing on the Mississippi River

DNR launches My Minnesota Outdoor Adventure

In partnership with Share the Mic Minnesota, we’re kicking off a unique social media campaign to encourage diversity, equity, and inclusion on Minnesota’s public lands and waters.

#MyMNOutdoorAdventure is launching in conjunction with the Governor’s Fishing Opener. We’re encouraging Minnesotans of diverse backgrounds to share your stories and pictures about fishing, hunting, camping and other outdoor activities by uploading them to the DNR’s website. The DNR will then feature these stories, and accompanying photos, on its Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter channels and also on its website.

More details:  Upload an outdoor story and photo

pike being released by a hand from a boat

Keeping pike? Be aware of northern pike zone regulations

If you might want to keep northern pike when the season opens on May 15, please familiarize yourself with the regulations and be prepared to measure the fish. Minnesota has three northern pike zones that apply to inland waters and reflect the differing characteristics of pike populations across the state.

More details:  DNR northern pike page

married combo license, new requirements, each spouse must provide full name, birthdate, social security number, driver's license number

How to buy married combination licenses and redeem vouchers

Do you usually purchase a married combination license? Please be aware of a change this year that brings the DNR into compliance with federal and state laws and helps prevent licenses from being issued to those with violations or unpaid fines. The change requires both spouses who purchase a married combination license to provide and verify their DNR customer records for these licenses.

If purchasing in person, both spouses must be present. If both are not present, one spouse may purchase their part of the license and their spouse may obtain their license at a later date at no additional charge using a spouse voucher number.

Anglers should remember to redeem their vouchers. Redeeming the voucher is quick and easy. Without redeeming the voucher, the spouse with the voucher cannot legally fish.

More details:  Married combination license page

boat in the water

Boaters: renew your watercraft registration online or in person

Boaters, please remember to renew your watercraft registration if it has expired. The DNR encourages boaters to renew boat registrations online or at a local deputy registrar’s office rather than by mail. If you renew online, you can print out the confirmation page to use as a temporary permit, or you may write down the temporary authorization number from the confirmation page. You’ll later get the registration card and expiration decals in the mail.

To renew online, visit the DNR’s online license sales web page, click on “Get Started” and follow the prompts. To renew in person, visit a deputy registrar. Deputy registrar locations are available on the Minnesota Department of Public Safety website.

More details:  DNR online license sales  and  DPS registrar location list

kid holding a big largemouth bass

Webinar focuses on how to consistently catch bass

Anyone interested in learning more about the finer points of bass fishing is invited to join a webinar at noon on Wednesday, May 19. The webinar is part of the Minnesota Outdoor Skills and Stewardship Series that aims to give participants quick, relevant information on upcoming seasons and events, and skills to help enjoy these opportunities.

During the webinar, Abbey Rabine, an avid and successful bass angler as well as pro-staff at Rapala, joins Ray Ruiz, DNR hunting and fishing skills liaison and also a pro tournament angler, to discuss how to catch more bass consistently, all year around.

More details:  DNR Outdoor Skills and Stewardship Series page

sunfish in hand

New to fishing? DNR has helpful information online to learn how

Anyone interested in learning how to fish can find helpful how-to guides on the DNR’s learn to fish pages. Find out how and where to fish, learn about fishing equipment, read about ways to catch different kinds of fish, and get acquainted with fishing ethics and stewardship.

More details:  DNR learn to fish page

Find fishing information

You can find the information you need about learning to fish, regulations, where to fish, aquatic invasive species, contacting a conservation officer and more on the DNR fishing page at  mndnr.gov/fishing .

In This Issue

Minnesota’s fishing opener is May 15 this year

Take a Mom Fishing Weekend is the weekend before fishing opener

Fishing seasons open for walleye, bass, trout in lakes, and northern pike on Saturday, May 15, with this year’s date taking the prize for the latest possible opener under Minnesota statute.

“We know there is some confusion about this year’s opener date,” said Jon Hansen, fisheries program consultant for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Minnesota statute sets the fishing opener as the Saturday two weeks prior to the Saturday of Memorial Day weekend. This year, with Memorial Day the latest it can be, on May 31, that puts the fishing opener on Saturday, May 15.

Also related to May fishing, there is an error in the printed version of the Minnesota Fishing Regulations book regarding the dates for the 2021 Take a Mom Fishing Weekend.

The correct dates for this year’s Take a Mom Fishing Weekend—when Minnesota-resident moms can fish without purchasing a license—are Saturday, May 8, to Sunday, May 9. That special weekend is defined in Minnesota statutes as the weekend that coincides with Mother’s Day. Most years, under Minnesota law, the fishing opener and Take a Mom Fishing Weekend fall on the same weekend, but not this year.

“We encourage Minnesota moms to get out and fish for free on May 8 and 9,” Hansen said. “Even though the walleye season won’t be open, there are still plenty of fun and easy fishing opportunities for crappie, sunfish, or even under-appreciated fish like buffalo, sucker, bullhead or sheepshead.”

Fishing season dates, and the corrected Minnesota Fishing Regulations handbook, are available online at  mndnr.gov/fishing .

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Observation of walleye egg take operations closed to public

Biologists with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will collect walleye eggs this spring; however, social distancing requirements mean this popular springtime activity will not be open for public viewing this year.

Hatcheries, the destination for the eggs collected, also remain closed to the public.

“Egg take operations are neat things to watch,” said Henry Drewes, northwest region fisheries supervisor. “But the closeness required to observe this work makes it impossible for onlookers to maintain safe and adequate social distancing among themselves and from DNR staff.”

Last year, DNR fisheries biologists did not collect walleye eggs because of COVID-related considerations. This year, egg collection procedures have been re-engineered to minimize close contact among employees.

Egg take stations and hatcheries will remain closed and offer no tours through 2021.

“We’re asking that people respect these closures and not visit these sites so we can work safely,” Drewes said. “We really appreciate the interest in our work, but keeping the public and DNR staff healthy is our number one priority.”

Video of the walleye egg take operation is available on the  DNR’s YouTube channel .

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DNR: Play it safe as early boating season gets underway

Many lakes and rivers throughout Minnesota are now ice-free, and those where ice remains likely will be open in the near future. People are understandably eager to hit the water, but it remains dangerously cold. That means it’s vital for people to exercise extreme caution whenever they’re on or around the water.

Each year, about 30 percent of fatal boating accidents in Minnesota occur during the cold-water period.

“Our boating season in Minnesota is limited, so we know people want to spend every moment they can on open water,” said Col. Rodmen Smith, director of the DNR Enforcement Division. “But even among the strongest of swimmers, a fall into the water in April is far more dangerous than the same fall in July because of the incapacitating effects of cold water.”

As boaters begin taking their first trips of the year onto the water, they should:

  • Ensure their boat is equipped with proper safety equipment and that it’s all functioning properly.
  • Wear a life jacket (foam is more effective than inflatables during the cold-water season). A life jacket is the one thing most likely to help people survive a fall into cold water.
  • Distribute weight evenly and abide by manufacturer’s weight limits to reduce the likelihood of falling overboard.
  • Have a means of communication. Boaters also should let other people know where they’re going and when they plan to return.
  • Watch the weather to avoid shifting winds or storms.

For more information about staying safe on or around cold water, visit the  DNR’s cold water dangers page .

Red Flag Warning issued

With extreme fire risk conditions across southern Minnesota this afternoon, the National Weather Service has issued a Red Flag Warning for the following counties:

Anoka, Big Stone, Blue Earth, Brown, Carver, Chippewa, Cottonwood, Dakota, Dodge, Douglas, Faribault, Fillmore, Freeborn, Goodhue, Hennepin, Jackson, Kandiyohi, Lac Qui Parle, Le Sueur, Lincoln, Lyon, Martin, McLeod, Meeker, Mower, Murray, Nicollet, Nobles, Olmsted, Pipestone, Pope, Ramsey, Redwood, Renville, Rice, Rock, Scott, Sherburne, Sibley, Stearns, Steele, Stevens, Swift, Traverse, Wabasha, Waseca, Washington, Watonwan, Wright and Yellow Medicine.

A Red Flag Warning means the area is experiencing critical weather conditions that are ideal for wildfire, including strong winds and low humidity. Do not burn while the Red Flag Warning remains in effect and check any burning done recently to ensure the fire is out. Any spark could become a wildfire under Red Flag conditions.

The Red Flag Warning expires at 8 p.m.

Stay connected, stay safe:

March 31, 2021

Stay informed! Here’s a weekly summary of upcoming wildlife and habitat management activities and ways you can discover, explore and experience Minnesota’s outdoors.

deer on trail camera

Talk with us about deer!

Do you have thoughts or questions about deer in your area? Today, wildlife staff dedicating time to discuss deer-related topics on the phone until 8 p.m. Local wildlife managers across the state invite the public to ask their deer-related questions and offer thoughts on deer issues.

In addition to discussing general concerns about deer, individuals can ask DNR staff about last year’s harvest data, share their own observations of local deer populations, discuss their thoughts on the upcoming 2021 deer season, or learn more about the deer population goal setting process or chronic wasting disease management. And if you can’t call today, you’re free to call at your convenience any time during business hours (8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.).

For details:  DNR deer open house webpage

ducks in a pond

Waterfowl town hall is Thursday

You can comment on proposed waterfowl hunting regulations and seasons. DNR proposals would: increase the Canada goose bag limit to five birds per day for the entire season; extend legal shooting hours to sunset for the entire season, eliminating the 4 p.m. early season closure; implement a five-day, early teal season as an experimental regulation for up to three years; allow over-water goose hunting during the early September season; and establish season dates through 2024. Online comment is open through Sunday, April 11, and an online town hall to discuss proposals is 6-8 p.m. Thursday, April 1.

For details:  DNR waterfowl public input page

woman with shotgun who will present webinar

Webinar on choosing a shotgun

Anyone wondering how to choose a shotgun for turkey hunting, upland bird hunting or target shooting can join a free webinar at noon on Wednesday, April 7. The webinar is part of a new Outdoor Skills and Stewardship Series from the DNR, with quick, relevant information on upcoming events and skills.

Other topics on Wednesdays through the end of May include fly fishing, spring foraging, Take a Mom Fishing Weekend, open water walleye fishing basics, backwater Mississippi River kayaking, bass fishing basics and the Quality Sunfish Initiative.

For details:  Registration pages for webinars

white an Ross' goose

Light goose harvest continues

Hunters can help reduce the population of light geese through a federally authorized spring conservation harvest that runs through April 30. Light geese are snow geese, blue-phased snow geese and the smaller Ross’s goose. Harvest regulations can be found on the DNR website. The conservation action aims to reduce damage from these geese to fragile ecosystems in Arctic coastal areas and around Hudson Bay.

For details:  Light goose harvest page

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources completes sand and gravel resource map for Kandiyohi County

DNR aggregate mapping projects ongoing in Redwood, Swift, and Sibley counties.

Geologists in the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources’ Aggregate Resource Mapping Program recently completed a new resource map showing the potential for sand and gravel deposits in Kandiyohi County. Aggregate resource maps are an important tool to assist in local land use planning and identifying local resources needed to construct roads, bridges, trails and buildings.

The project’s datasets, including a map to locate sand and gravel and a countywide gravel pit survey, are publically available on the DNR’s online interactive  statewide mapping website .

The sand and gravel map for Kandiyohi County is the most recent product from the DNR that provides field-researched information to help land use planners, industry, and others make informed decisions on how to maintain access to and best use these resources for local infrastructure and construction needs.

DNR geologists use geologic mapping techniques like field surveys and drilling combined with computer programs to find sand, gravel, and crushed stone resources and characterize the quality of a deposit.

Minnesota’s largest sand and gravel deposits are thousands of years old

Almost all of the accessible aggregate resources in Kandiyohi were deposited more than 10,000 years ago, when meltwater streams from glacial land formations deposited sand and gravel in different areas of the state.

“It would take another glaciation to replenish that supply.” said Chad Crotty, DNR aggregate geologist who worked on the sand and gravel map for Kandiyohi County. “Not only are these resources nonrenewable, but they are also unevenly distributed across the state, leading to a lack of locally available aggregate in certain areas.”

It is important to understand where these resources are located. In an area of aggregate scarcity, planners and industry leaders can use aggregate maps to ensure that any sand and gravel deposits remain accessible and affordable for future generations of construction projects.

DNR working on multiple aggregate map projects

The Minnesota Legislature established DNR’s Aggregate Resource Mapping Program in 1984. Their goal is to complete detailed aggregate maps for every county statewide.

Today, 20 Minnesota counties have access to completed aggregate resource maps.
A three-year grant from the Minnesota Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund, as recommended by the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources, provided funding for aggregate resource mapping in Kandiyohi, Redwood, Swift, and Sibley counties.

For more information, visit the  Aggregate Mapping Methodology webpage .

July 30, 2019

Stay informed! Here’s a weekly summary of upcoming wildlife and habitat management activities, and ways you can discover, explore and experience Minnesota’s outdoors.

Minnesota Hunting Regulations cover from 2019 with a deer, woods, logo and #huntmn, effective date through June 30, 2020 and mndnr.gov/hunting

Deer season regulations available

Hunters can start planning ahead for significant changes to deer season regulations.

The 2019 Minnesota Hunting and Trapping Regulations handbook is now available on the DNR’s deer hunting page at  mndnr.gov/hunting/deer .

Hunting licenses go on sale this Thursday, Aug. 1, and are available at any DNR license agent, by telephone at 888-646-6367 or online at  mndnr.gov/buyalicense . Remember to check that your license information is up-to-date and to sign the license.

Youth deer season goes statewide

A statewide youth deer season runs from Thursday, Oct. 17, through Sunday, Oct. 20, for youth hunters ages 10-17. In the past, the youth season was only available in the southeast, northwest and Twin Cities metro permit areas.

Deer feeding and attractant ban expands Sept. 1

Minnesotans in central and southeast Minnesota should pay close attention to the deer feeding and attractant ban rule. The area where deer feeding and using deer attractants is prohibited will expand starting Sunday, Sept. 1, in areas of central and southeast Minnesota where CWD was detected in farmed or wild deer.

Feeding and attractants increase the risk of disease transmission between animals by bringing them together in close contact, which is a mechanism for CWD spread.

antlerless deer in Minnesota

Read up on CWD changes

There are several changes to deer permit area numbering this year that will clarify  where CWD management and surveillance occurs . Deer permit areas within a CWD management zone, in southeast and north central Minnesota, will now be part of a 600-series permit areas. The metro deer permit area will be renamed to 701 from 601.

Carcass import ban continues

The DNR is, as in previous years, enforcing carcass movement restrictions to limit the spread of disease. Hunters will also need to be aware of mandatory sampling during all deer seasons in the CWD management zones (southeast and north central), and over the opening weekend of the firearms season in the CWD control zone (southeast, bordering the CWD management zone) and in surveillance areas (central).

grassland and sky on a CPL project

Legacy grant applications open starting Aug. 1

Groups that want to restore, protect or enhance public land or land permanently protected by conservation easements can apply for Conservation Partners Legacy (CPL) grants.

These grants help pay for work on Minnesota prairies, forests, wetlands or other habitat for fish and wildlife.

In all, $10.3 million in Legacy grants are available this year. Nonprofit organizations and government entities are eligible to submit applications for the Expedited Conservation Project cycle until 4 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 16, and for the traditional and metro grant cycles until 4 p.m. Monday, Sept. 23, on the DNR website at  mndnr.gov/cpl .

Twins ball and hat on the ball with DNR logo

Hunting license gets you a Twins cap

Your hunting or fishing license gets you access to a special Minnesota Twins ticket package and a free blaze orange Twins cap! The next date on this year’s Minnesota DNR Days partnership with the Twins is a 7:10 p.m. Friday, Aug. 2, game against the Kansas City Royals.

Anyone with a 2019 Minnesota fishing or hunting license can  purchase reserved game tickets online  through this special offer and receive an exclusive hat you’ll pick up at the game.

fishing license with DNR logo, 19, to Willy W Walleye and all the license text and signature line

Caution when you buy a license

Don’t get scammed! Hunters and anglers who buy their licenses online should do so only from the Minnesota DNR website. There are websites that claim to sell fishing and hunting licenses – and will take your money – but you may come away from the transaction with extra charges or with improper licensure. When you buy a license online, always start at  mndnr.gov/buyalicense , which will redirect you to DNR’s license vendor at  jc.activeoutdoorsolutions.com .

Minnesota Fishing

July 30, 2019

Stay informed! Here’s a weekly summary of upcoming fisheries and habitat management activities, and ways you can discover, explore and experience Minnesota’s outdoors.

a large sunfish

DNR seeks to

improve sunfish sizes

Large sunfish are scarce in many Minnesota lakes.

Local fisheries managers with the DNR are responding to angler desire for bigger sunfish by seeking out specific lakes that would be a good fit for improving sunfish size quality by reducing sunfish bag limits.

Starting this summer, fisheries managers will be meeting with local angling groups to gauge support for reducing the sunfish bag limit on some lakes through the DNR’s process of proposing special regulations. Learn more  about large sunfish and the Quality Bluegill Initiative  on the DNR website.

An angler fishing on the Mississippi River

Fish the mighty Mississippi

Anyone who wants to try fishing is invited to family fishing events happening at four locations over four days along the Mississippi River.

The events are geared toward anyone who doesn’t much have experience with fishing, lacks fishing equipment or wants to learn how to fish on the river’s edge. People can attend one or more days:

  • Coon Rapids Dam Regional Park in Coon Rapids, 4-8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 15
  • Boom Island Park in Minneapolis, 4-8 p.m. Friday Aug. 16
  • Hidden Falls Regional Park in St. Paul, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17
  • Lake Rebecca Park in Hastings, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 18.

Can’t make it? Potential anglers who want to learn how to fish can visit the DNR website at  mndnr.gov/GoFishing .

walleye in a net

Cass Lake draft plan available

Cass Lake – one of Minnesota’s 10 large walleye lakes – has a new draft management plan and the DNR is seeking input on it. The plan outlines the proposed five-year fish population objectives and fisheries management actions for Cass Lake and connected waters on the Cass Lake Chain, and incorporates recommendations from a 14-member Cass Lake Fisheries Input Group.

Check out the draft plan online , and you’ll be able to  comment online , or pick up a paper questionnaire at the  Bemidji Area Fisheries office . The final plan will be completed in October.

lake scene

Come talk about fishing, AIS and access

You’re invited to join conversations about public access to Minnesota’s lakes and rivers, providing excellent recreational fishing and stopping the spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS). You can attend any of three meetings that start 10 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 1, in Alexandria; Saturday, Aug. 10, in Brainerd; and Thursday, Aug. 15, in Monticello.  Find the details and register online .

Twins ball graphic

Fishing license gets you a Twins cap

Your fishing or hunting license gets you access to a special Minnesota Twins ticket package and a free blaze orange Twins cap! The next date on this year’s Minnesota DNR Days partnership with the Twins is a 7:10 p.m. Friday, Aug. 2, game against the Kansas City Royals.

Anyone with a 2019 Minnesota fishing or hunting license can  purchase reserved game tickets online  through this special offer and receive an exclusive hat you’ll pick up at the game.

A fishing license to Willy W Walleye with license text and signature line

Caution when you buy a license

Don’t get scammed! Anglers and hunters who buy their licenses online should do so only from the Minnesota DNR website. There are websites that claim to sell fishing and hunting licenses – and will take your money – but you may come away from the transaction with extra charges or with improper licensure. When you buy a license online, always start at  mndnr.gov/buyalicense , which will redirect you to DNR’s license vendor at  jc.activeoutdoorsolutions.com .

For Immediate Release:

June 21, 2019

bee on flower

Pollinators are key to Minnesota’s environmental health

Without them, we wouldn’t have some of our favorite foods. They are vital to a healthy environment. They’re also beautiful and fascinating to watch. They’re pollinators, and this week is dedicated to understanding, appreciating and helping them.

Bees, butterflies and hummingbirds are needed to pollinate plants that provide Minnesota food crops such as fruits, vegetables and herbs. Some of these foods are important for wildlife, too. Black bears, for example, eat raspberries that are pollinated by bumble bees. Honey bees and native pollinators contribute millions of dollars to Minnesota’s agricultural economy.

Pollinators play a critical role in keeping our environment healthy. They help maintain the health of the many plants that stabilize the soil and prevent erosion. These plants also buffer waterways, store carbon, and provide habitat for other wildlife. Plus, flowering landscapes are beautiful. Without pollinators, our environment would look very different.

“Pollinators are so important, not just to flowers but to our whole environment, and there are many simple things Minnesotans can do to help pollinators,” said DNR invertebrate ecologist Jessica Petersen.

To help pollinators:

  • Plant a variety of flowers, especially those that are native to the area.
  • Keep gardens blooming all season long; choose plants that provide pollen and nectar in the spring, summer and fall.
  • Provide nesting sites by allowing dead branches and logs to remain, leaving bare earth for ground-nesting insects, or installing bee nesting blocks.
  • Reduce pesticide use.
  • Become a citizen scientist and help researchers collect data about pollinators and their habitat.
  • Tell friends and family about pollinators and inspire them to take action.

A list of pollinator resources is available on the  DNR website .

Minnesota DNR News

Questions?  The DNR Information Center now answers your calls from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday through Friday and

9a.m.-1 p.m. on Saturday and offers interpreter services. Call 888-646-6367 or email  info.dnr@state.mn.us .

In This Issue